Medicine Cat Herbs (01/09/12 - being updated and expanded)

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Medicine Cat Herbs (01/09/12 - being updated and expanded)

Post by Loki on Fri Nov 12, 2010 12:56 am

Some plants may be listed in multiple categories since they may apply to more than one.
For example, Common Alder Bark is good for aches, while the Leaves are good for fever, therefore is listed in the Treatments of Aches and Pains and Treatments of Fevers and Diseases.

Some things that may interest you.
Spoiler:
Fun Fact:
Allergies.
While it is rare, cats can be allergic to some herbs.
For instance: a cat who is allergic to Feverfew may develop sore in his/her mouth.
A cat may experience some gas, nasty dirt, and even vomiting if an herb does not agree.
In some cases, a cat may be fatally allergic to an herb. This is something that may be hereditary, and should be kept in mind.

Bear in Mind:
If you use the wrong part of an herb, a cat may experience: pain, nausea, vomiting, nasty dirt, gas, loss of vision, loss of hearing and possibly death.
BE CAREFUL.


Treatments of Aches and Pains
____________________________________________

Spoiler:
(Black) Alder Bark

Description:
Location: Grows mainly in boggy, wet terrain.
Effect: Eases toothaches.

Season: Bark may be harvested year-round.
Harvesting: The bark may be stripped by carefully choosing soft, fresh bark from lowest parts of the trunk (but not the roots).

Preparation: Leave the fresh bark out in the sun to dry to the fullest.
Usage: Eat the dry bark. Some water may be good afterwards.

Storage: Keep dry. Do not store before bark is completely dry, otherwise it will rot.
Shelf Life: Unknown. If stored properly, bark is thought to last forever.
Signs of Improper Storage: The bark is damp, foul smelling, black where it should not be, infested with insects.
Using from Storage: Dampening the dry bark slightly may help the patient chew it.

(Common) Alder Leaves

Description:
Location: Grows mainly in boggy, wet terrain.
Effects: The juice of the leaves soothe burns and skin inflammations, and helps with chest inflammations; the fresh leaves soothe sore pads.

Season: The leaves may only be harvested fresh in early spring to mid-summer.
Harvesting: The fresh leaves may be stripped from the tree. Do not harvest dead, crumbly, or rotting leaves.

Preparation: The leaves may be eaten after harvesting, or after a brief washing (if deemed necessary).
Usage: With some water to dilute it, apply the juice of the leaves directly to chest for to soothe chest inflammations. Apply full fresh leaves directly to skin inflammations.
Do not ingest leaves.


Storage: Keep dry.
Shelf Life: The leaves will last about 3 moons, then will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, curled at edges, foul smelling, oddly sweet smelling, turning brown or black with holes.
Using from Storage: Dampen the leaves so the juices are accessible, and so the leaves will stick to skin.


(Little) Daisy Leaf:

Description: (Little) Daisy Leaves are thick, dark green, oval shaped leaves found on short Daisy plants.
Location: Best found in fields, meadows, and gardens.
Effect: Soothes aching joints.

Season: The daisy flowers all year-round.
Harvesting: The fresh leaves are to be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: The leaves are chewed into a poultice.
Usage: Apply the poultice directly to skin.

Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. Do not store before completely dry. The poultice may be stored for a week before it begins to rot.
Shelf Life: The leaves may last up to three moons, if stored properly. The poultice lasts, at most, two weeks. The leaves will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, curled at edges, foul smelling, oddly sweet smelling, turning brown or black with holes.
Using from Storage: Lightly dampen dry leaves, then chew into poultice.

Dandelion Stems:

Description:
Location: Found everywhere; an insufferable weed.
Effects: Soothes bee stings.

Season: The dandelion flowers only in the warmer seasons, but the stems may be found all year-round.
Harvesting: The stems are nipped from the plant.

Preparation: Chew the white juice from the stem.
Usage: Apply the white juice of the stem to the sting.

Storage: Dry the stem in the sun (this will not take long). Keep dry.
Shelf Life: Six moons, if stored properly. The plant will be brittle and crumbling by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The stems are damp, smell sweet, are mushy, turning brown or black.
Using from Storage: The stems will need to be soaked to make the dry white juice accessible.

Feverfew:

Description: Small bush with flowers like a daisy.
Location: Found near and in twoleg gardens, occasionally found in damper places, or along water sources.
Effects: Heals aches and headaches.

Season: Summer.
Harvesting: The fresh or older leaves may be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: Keep fresh.
Usage: Have the patient eat the leaves.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. Do not store until nearly or completely dry.
Shelf Life: 6 moons if stored properly. The leaves will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes.
Using from Storage: The leaves may be consumed dry, but dampen the leaves with water or berry juice if you feel the patient needs it.

Juniper Berries:

Description: Juniper berries grow on a bush with dark green, spiky leaves. The berries are purple in color.
Location: Found in fields near marshes.
Effects: Soothe bellyaches.

Season: Late springtime to early summer.
Harvesting: The ripe berries may be plucked from the plant. Unripe berries may be plucked.

Preparation: No preparation needed for ripe berries (unless washing is deemed necessary). Unripe berries must be allowed to ripen.
Usage: The berries are eaten.


Storage: Dry the berries in the sun. The unripe berries must be kept cool.
Shelf Life: If stored properly, 2-3 moons.
Signs of Improper Storage: The dried berries are damp, smell foul, are turning green or black, falling apart, or the green berries ripened and rotted.
Using from Storage: Dampen and crush the berries to make their juice potent once more. More berries may be needed than if you were using fresh berries.


Mallow Leaves:

Description:
Location: Found at the edge of fields, in hedgerows, in twoleg gardens, and on the river shores.
Effects: Soothes a cat's belly.

Season: Late spring to early summer.
Harvesting: Pluck the leaves from the plant at sunhigh, when they are driest.

Preparation: The leaves are kept dry.
Usage: The leaves are eaten dry.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. Do not store before they are dry.
Shelf Life: Three moons, if stores properly. The leaves will be crumbly by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes.
Using from Storage: The leaves are eaten dry, but may be eaten with some Juniper Berry juice or water.


Ragwort Leaves:

Description:
Location: Commonly found in pastures and wild fields.
Effects: Helps aching joints.

Season: Summer.
Harvesting: The leaves may be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: Bruise the leaves with Juniper Berries into a poultice for aching joints.
Usage: The poultice is applied to the aching joints.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. You may try to dry the bruised leaves.
Shelf Life: Three moons at most. The leaves will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes, curling strangely at the edges.
Using from Storage: To bruise the leaves, dampen them first.


Watermint:

Description: A green, leafy plant.
Location: Usually found in streams or damp earth.
Effects: Eases bellyache.

Season: Late-spring to mid-summer.
Harvesting: The leaves may be plucked from the plant - take care not to drown.

Preparation: Chew the leaves into a into a pulp.
Usage: The patient eats the chewed leaves.


Storage: Dry the leaves. Do not store before completely dry.
Shelf Life: Three moons, if stored properly.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes, curling strangely at the edges.
Using from Storage: Dampen the leaves before chewing.


Willow Bark:
This bark serves as a painkiller.

Description:
Location: Grows near twoleg places and rivers.
Effects: Painkiller.

Season: The bark is available year-round.
Harvesting: The bark may be stripped by carefully choosing soft, fresh bark from lowest parts of the trunk (but not the roots), or from the branches if needed.

Preparation: Dry the bark in the sun, or keep fresh.
Usage: The patient eats the bark.


Storage: Dry the bark in the sun. Do not store until fully dry.
Shelf Life: Unknown. While Willow Bark is softer than other types of bark, it can last as long as normal bark when stores properly.
Signs of Improper Storage: The bark is damp, foul smelling, black where it should not be, infested with insects.
Using from Storage: Dampening the dry bark slightly may help the patient chew it.


Yarrow Ointment
The ointment of yarrow can also be used to soften and help heal cracked paw pads.

Description:
Location: Found in wastelands, damp places and meadows.
Effects: Softens and heals cracked pads.

Season: Mid-late summer.
Harvesting: The leaves may be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: The leaves are to be bruised to bring out juice - be sure not to swallow them if you're chewing them.
Usage: Apply the juice to the cracked or sore pads.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. Do not store until fully dry.
Shelf Life: About three moons, of stores properly.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes, curling strangely at the edges.
Using from Storage: The leaves must be dampened then crushed to bring out any juices. More leaves must be used to get same effect as fresh leaves.

Windflower (Anemone)
Headaches.


Treatment of Wounds
____________________________________________

Spoiler:

Avens
Disinfectant.

Blackberry Leaves:
These leaves are chewed into a pulp to treat bee stings.


Burdock Root:
Tall stemmed thistle with a sharp smell and dark leaves. When the root is dug up and washed off of dirt, it is chewed into a pulp, and put on wounds inflicted by to keep them from becoming infected. Can also be used on infected rat bites to lessen and heal the pain.

Celandine:
This herb can be used to soothe the eyes if ever damaged.

Chervil:
A sweet smelling plant with large, spreading, leafy, fern like leaves and small white flowers. The juice of the leaves can be used for infected wounds, and chewing the root also helps with bellyache.

Cobwebs:
Very common in the forest, just be careful not to bring the spider along with you! Put it on a wound to soak up and stop (or slow) the bleeding. It may also be used to bind broken bones.

Cornflower:
Helps wounds heal, good for eye issues.

Dock:
Similar to Sorrel, the leaves can be chewed up and applied to soothe scratches.

Dried Oak Leaf:
Most readily available in autumn/leaf-fall, the leaves are stored in a dry place, and can stop infection when applied.

Comfrey:
Large leaves and small shaped flowers, which range in color from pink, white, or purple. Its fat, black-colored roots, when chewed into a poultice, can be used to repair broken bones or to soothe wounds.

Goldenrod:
A tall, plant with bright, yellow flowers. When chewed into a poultice, it is good for healing wounds.

Horsetail:
A tall, bristly-stemmed plant that grows in marshy areas, territories. The leaves can be chewed into a poultice, and applied to infected wounds to help treat them.

Marigold:
A low-growing flower that is bright orange or yellow in color. The petals or leaves can be chewed into a pulp and applied to wounds as a poultice to stop infection. It could be used to treat rat bites, but sometimes it's not strong enough.

Ragweed:
Like Lamb's Ear, this herb, commonly found in the mountains, gives a cat strength, and was first discovered by the Tribe cats.
Raspberry Leaves:
A herb used during kitting. It could be a painkiller, or to help stop bleeding during the kitting.

Rush:
This herb is used to bind broken bones. It has long narrow leaves and lavender colored head stalks.

Stinging Nettle:
The leaves, when applied to a wound, can bring down swelling.

Violet Leaves:
Good for cooling the body.

Wild Garlic:
When rolled in, it can help prevent infection. Especially good for rat bites. Due to its strong smell, it is good at hiding the scent of a certain Clan, and disguising cats on raids.


Treatment of Fevers and Diseases
____________________________________________

Spoiler:

(Common) Alder Bark

Description:
Location: Grows mainly in boggy, wet terrain.
Effects: The bark cools the body.

Season: Bark may be harvested year-round.
Harvesting: The bark may be stripped by carefully choosing soft, fresh bark from lowest parts of the trunk (but not the roots). Dryer bark may be harvested, but be careful not to strip dead or rotted bark.


Preparation: Leave the fresh bark out in the sun to dry to the fullest.
Usage: Eat the dry bark to cool the body.

Storage: Keep bark dry. Do not store before bark is completely dry, otherwise it will rot.
Shelf Life: Bark shelf life is unknown. Thought to be able to last for years if stored properly.
Signs of Improper Storage: The bark is damp, foul smelling, black where it should not be, infested with insects.
Using from Storage: Dampening the dry bark slightly may help the patient chew it.

Catmint/Catnip:
A leafy and delicious-smelling plant. They are rarely found in the wild, and are mostly found in Twoleg gardens. Best remedy for the deadly Greencough, which kits and elders usually catch in the season of leaf-bare.

Chickweed:
Like Catmint/Catnip, it can be used to treat Greencough.

Coltsfoot:
A flowering, dandelion-like plant with yellow or white flowers. The leaves are chewed into a pulp, and given to cats with difficulty breathing or a cough. It also can be used to treat kitten-cough, as well as cracked or sore pads.

Feverfew:

Description: Small bush with flowers like a daisy.
Location: Found near and in twoleg gardens, occasionally found in damper places, or along water sources.
Effects: Reduces body temperature for those with fever or chills.

Season: Summer.
Harvesting: The fresh or older leaves may be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: Keep fresh.
Usage: Have the patient eat the leaves.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun. Do not store until nearly or completely dry.
Shelf Life: 6 moons if stored properly. The leaves will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes.
Using from Storage: The leaves may be consumed dry, but dampen the leaves with water or berry juice if you feel the patient needs it.

Lavender:
A small, purple, flowering plant that cures fever and chills.

Tansy:
The tansy plant has round, yellow leaves, and a very sweet and strong smell, making it good at disguising a cat's scent. It is used for curing coughs, but must be eaten in small doses.



Spoiler:


Heather Flower:
It can be included in herbal mixtures, to make it easier to swallow.

Honey:
A sweet,golden-colored liquid that is created by bees. While difficult to
obtain without being stung, it is great for soothing infections, sore throats, or cats who have breathed smoke. Also helps cats swallow other medicine. It is given to cats using wads of moss soaked in it.

Juniper Berries:
Juniper berries grow on a bush with dark green, spiky leaves. The berries are purple in color, give strength, and help troubled breathing. It is also used to help calm cats.


Mouse Bile:
Extracted from the mouse. The only remedy for ticks, mouse bile is foul smelling, and is stored in moss. When dabbed on a tick, the tick falls off. Smell can be masked by wild garlic, or by washing paws in running water. If accidentally swallowed, can leave a horrible taste in mouth for days. Medicine cats always have to remember to wash their paws in a body of water after using mouse bile.




Other

Mental Herbs (Calming and Strengthening)
____________________________________________

Spoiler:
Juniper Berries:
It is also used to help calm cats and give strength.

Lamb's Ear:
Commonly found in the mountains, this herb gives a cat strength. This herb was discovered first by the Tribe cats.


Ragwort Leaves:


Description:
Location: Commonly found in pastures and wild fields.
Effects: Strengthening herb.

Season: Summer.
Harvesting: The leaves may be plucked from the plant.

Preparation: The leaves may be dried, or eaten fresh.
Usage: The leaves are eaten.


Storage: Dry the leaves in the sun.
Shelf Life: Three moons at most. The leaves will be falling apart by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The leaves are damp, smell foul, are mushy, turning brown or black with holes, curling strangely at the edges.
Using from Storage: The dry leaves may be eaten.


Thyme:
This herb can be eaten to calm nervousness, anxiety, and cats who are in shock.

Juniper Berries:
Juniper berries grow on a bush with dark green, spiky leaves. The berries are purple in color, give strength, and help troubled breathing. It is also used to help calm cats.

Chamomile:
This herb can be used to strengthen the heart and soothe the mind.

Sedatives
____________________________________________


Spoiler:
Dandelion Roots:

Description:
Location: Found everywhere; an insufferable weed.
Effects: Sedative.

Season: The dandelion flowers only in the warmer seasons, but the roots may be found all year-round.
Harvesting: The roots are dug from the ground.

Preparation: Use immediately, or dry in sun if needed.
Usage: Have the patient chew the roots.

Storage: Dry the roots in the sun (this will not take long). Keep dry.
Shelf Life: Six moons, if stored properly. The plant will be brittle and crumbling by the end.
Signs of Improper Storage: The roots are damp, smell sweet, are mushy, turning brown or black.
Using from Storage: The roots will need to be dampened to make them easier to chew.

Poppy Seeds:
Small black seeds that are shaken out of a dried poppy flower head. They can put a cat to sleep, or soothe shock and distress, but is not recommended to nursing queens. They are given by wetting the paw,
pressing on them, causing them to stick to the paw, and then having the sick or injured cat lick them off. Another method is to place them on a leaf, and have the sick or injured cat lick them off from there. They
also help soothe pain.
Pregnancy Herbs
____________________________________________

Spoiler:
Borage Leaves:
It is easily distinguished by its small blue or pink star-shaped flowers and hairy leaves. When it is chewed and eaten by nursing queens, it produces better milk. It also brings down fevers.

Parsley:
Stops a queen from producing milk if her kits die or don't need milk anymore.


Misc.

Burial Herbs
____________________________________________

Lavender
Meadowsweet
Mint
Rosemary
Pine

Traveling Herbs
____________________________________________

Spoiler:
Sorrel, Daisy, Chamomile and Burnet

Poisons and Treatments
____________________________________________

Spoiler:

Bittersweet:
Looks like Nightshade, and acts like it.

Stinging Nettle Seeds:
Like yarrow, can be given to a cat who has been poisoned by crow-food, Twoleg waste, or other toxic objects.

Tormentil:
Cures poisons.

Yarrow:
A flowering plant whose leaves can be made into a poultice, and applied to wounds to extract poison. Also, it will make a cat vomit.

Herbs for "Lower Functions"
____________________________________________

Barley
The runs.

Wild Carrot
Stomach cramps.

The format.
Spoiler:

This is here so I (LS) have a skeleton for expansions when I edit. Do not remove!

Description:
Location:
Effects:

Season:
Harvesting:

Preparation:
Usage:


Storage:
Shelf Life:
Signs of Improper Storage:
Using from Storage:

Anyone else who wishes to use this list or this skeleton must credit The Outcast Warriors RPG when they post it. Here is the code:

Code:
 [b]Description[/b]:
[b]Location[/b]:
[b]Effects[/b]:

[b]Season[/b]:
[b]Harvesting[/b]:

[b]Preparation[/b]:
[b]Usage[/b]:

[b]Storage[/b]:
[b]Shelf Life:[/b]
[b]Signs of Improper Storage:[/b]
[b]Using from Storage:[/b]


Last edited by Longstorm on Sun Sep 02, 2012 9:15 pm; edited 11 times in total (Reason for editing : There will be pictures soon. I wanted to put down seasons and harvesting instructions, and to add some herbs from the same book the Erin Hunters use. I also found some herbs that would work as a torture device, something AbyssClan would use.)
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Loki
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Join date : 2010-11-11
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